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, japan struggles to deal with two disasters of staggering force and skate. a massive queark, -- earthquake, then a tsunami. officials confirm 200 dead but expect the numbers to rise sharmly. and there is a worry about damage around the if you can if you can power -- fukushima power plant. we take you inside zsa zsa -- war isia -- for a look at the fiercest fighting in lebia. for sheer terror and destruction, the awesome scale of what the natural world can do to us, perhaps only volcanos come close. the japan earthquake, one of the biggest the world has ever seen. it struck off the coast near the city of sendai in the late afternoon. tsunami alerts were declared in several countries. alan little reports. >> how suddenly it strikes. mortal danger descends almost in the blink of an eye and without warning. it is terrifying. in an instant, there is chaos. then from the vastness of seat there is a threat more menacing still -- a wall of water more than 20 feet high advances across the ocean at speeds of up to 500 miles an hour, the speed of a jet aircraft. japan's tsunami defense
of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> a new day in japan revues -- reveals the next scale of devastation. hundreds of people are dead and towns and cities have a been devastated. >> i wasn't thinking about anything other than surviving because there was this very real sense of panic. >> a state of emergency issued after two new power plants, tens of thousands are urged to evacuate their homes. a massive relief operation, the japanese government has asked for international help. tsunami alerts have been downgraded across the region. welcome to bbc news, broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. a mammoth relief mission is swinging and action in northeastern japan after it was struck by a devastating tsunami claiming hundreds of lives. the disaster was triggered by a 8.9 magnitude earthquake, the most powerful since records began in that country. states of emergency have been declared. people living nearby, up to 300 bodies have been found. >> suddenly it strikes. almost in the blank of the night and without warning. it is terrifying. there is a threat
in this story. >>> that frantic battle to contain a nuclear situation growing more serious by the moment. japan is asking the u.s. for help and a very, very small particle of radiation has reached the united states. japan just raised the level of this nuclear incident from a 4 to a 5, although other experts had already pegged it at a 6 on the scale of 7. nuclear experts have been saying for days, japan is underplaying this crisis. here are the official numbers. 6,539 people are dead. of course that number has been climbing steadily. right now, another 10,354 people still missing. as japan struggles to deal with the aftermath of this disaster, 410,000 people are living in shelters or with friends because they have no homes to go to or had to leave the contamination zone. take a look at this new video. it is the closest look we had at japan's troubled fukushima nuclear complex. it's the reason why many people are leaving. a diplomat just told the associated press that a miniscule levels of radiation have reached california's coast. although he says it's, quote, about a billion times beneath level
mallicoat. the shear magnitude of the catastrophe in japan is staggering. and the numbers are barely beginning to tell the story. the official death toll now stands at about 2800 from friday's earthquake and tsunami. 2,000 bodies washed up on shore today alone but one police chief estimates more than 10,000 have died in his province alone. meanwhile, there is more bad news from one of japan's damaged nuclear power plant, and randall pinkston reports, a third cooling system at the fukushima plant has failed. >> reporter: a second explosion at the crippled nuclear power plant in japan sent a huge column of smoke in the sky and all three reactors are in jeopardy of total meltdown. more than 120,000 people have been evacuated from a 12-mile area and many outside that zone are also leaving. >> we would like to be further away from the plant. >> reporter: in the hard-hit city here, government troops are picking through mountains of rubble searching for survivors. thousands are missing and feared dead. across the shattered northeast coast, millions are struggling for survival after friday's
radiation from the failing reactor in japan may reach the california coast today, but u.c. berkeley engineers say it's already here. should you be worried? >> the live look at the embarcadero, we have light showers, tracking heavier showers and thunder around the bay area. i'll show you where. >> good morning, roads are wet and we have road work on the dumbarton and bay bridge. details coming up. >> good friday morning. it is 4:30. we do have some rain in the area as mike told you. i saw a guy jogging when i came to work. >> that is dedication. >> let's check in with mike. >> it is pretty active with healthy cells in marin county where we have yellows showing up around vallejo and downed 680 and 780 as you move into the western section all was the do i town half moon bay. let's take a look at the north bay. this is where a little lightning strike around fort ross earlier and now over to healdsburg, increase in rain there. as we look at the bay, couple of storms to the left. those will arrive in about 45 minutes. south bay is rather quiet. you'll get your rain, as a matter of time. i
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
particles from japan have reached the bay area. they detected it on the student monitors here, i'll tell you if you should be worried coming up. >> live look at golden gate bridge this morning. we've had rain and showers move through. i'm tracking two strong storms that will move through our area in three days. flooding is possible, hail, thunder, maybe power outages. >> road are wet. we've seen a couple of spinouts. >> and libya with frozen airspace after united nations security council votes to put a no-fly zone over the country. >> got some rain out there. possibly slick roads. i'm eric thomas. >> i'm kristen sze. let's talk about that. mike, what is going on? >> we have showers. we talked about showers ahead of the main line. that is exactly what we're dealing with. some of those are stronger and oranges on the radar but seeing some of this tape earned a not be quite as strong. in fact, we had a couple lightning bolts, as it's moving through santa rosa and st. helena, same thing around san rafael heading over 37 around novato and then heading over 37 toward vallejo. then light rain aroun
at a nuclear plant in the earthquake-devastated region of japan. the japanese government is confirming a radiation leak has happened. and they are fighting against a nuclear meltdown. we have a live report for you from tokyo ahead. >> the massive earthquake triggering a ripple effect across the pacific hitting hawaii and governor brown if california call for a state of emergency along the northern coast including in santa cruz. >> in japan, the third largest producer of nuclear power and how trouble at the nuclear reactor could devastate global markets. friend friend hour two begins right now. >> good morning, everyone, thank you for joining us. and now you need to say glued to the show for three hours because there is so much breaking news including what is going on in japan. they are racing to prevent a meltdown after an explosion at the largest nuclear plant. the nation is getting a look at the destruction. you can see the images. >> these are new images as crews are getting out to assess the damage. adam housley is on the ground in tokyo assessing what is going on. tokyo is the sta
at a nuclear plant in japan grows my dire by the hour. tonight, the warning from the united states top nuclear chief. plus, the workers who stayed behind and put their lives on the line. i'm shepard smith live in tokyo. the news starts now. they fight their way through radiation and dodge explosions in the dark. risking their own lives for their country. the unseen heros who may be japan's last line of defense against an even bigger disaster. meanwhile, an emotional reunion for one quake survivor. but search crews also finding more victims. and one relief worker says the situation at the shelters is getting desperate. >> the stores are empty. nothing is getting through here. >> shepard: plus, an american who lived through the quake and tsunami finally gets word to her family. now, the battle to bring her home. most experts say the radiation will not reach the united states. lots of americans apparently are not listening. tonight the iodine rush and the reality check. good thursday morning from tokyo just past 8:00 a.m. where the situation is devolving quickly. there is now no water, according
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
, we'll bring that to you live. in japan today here, the focus really is on this number 3 reactor. that is where we saw the video. you see it here of these helicopters dropping water. sea water in this attempt to cool it off and prevent a possible meltdown. tokyo electric or tepco is in this desperate rush to build a power line so the fukushima daiichi plant can power up its cooling systems once again. later on in this newscast, i'll be speaking with a man, an american man who was inside one of the facility, actually in a building next to one of the reactors working when the quake hit last friday. >> cracks were opening up on the ground. i looked over at the buildings around me and glass was breaking, lights, sirens, people screaming. >> can you imagine? he's a software engineer there for a couple weeks working on the power plant's computers. he has not spoken to cn nyet. but he will on this tram. we will also check in with our team in tokyo where shrinking supplies of food and gases are a growing concern. >>> a lot of ground to cover here. right off the bat, i want to show you so
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
, survived two days in a -- on a rooftop before they were rescued. a little bit of good news out of japan. and folks who got -- we have a lot of information how to help the victims of the earthquake and tsunami in japan, foxnews.com for details on that, it is worth your time, thanks for watching. shepard is in tokyo and he starts now. >> shepard: 4:00 a.m. wednesday morning in tokyo, 3:00 tuesday afternoon, in new york. i'm shepard smith reporting from japan's capital. the troubled fukushima nuclear plant to the north said to be releasing dangerous radioactive material into the atmosphere, at one point it was drifting toward our location in tokyo until the winds changed and pushed it out over the pacific ocean. officials here ordering tens of thousands of people, near the plant to seal themselves indoors in their homes or businesses or whatever, the earthquake knocked out the system that feeps the fuel rods cool and helicopters may begin dumping sea water on the troubled reactors to keep them from overheating and the local power company says it is their own option and the water will evapo
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
in libya. also breaking news on the deteriorating situation in japan. so welcome, once again, to "american morning." it's been a week now since all of this happened. the tsunami, the earthquake, the number of dead in japan continuing to rise as hopes fade of finding any more survivors amid the rubble. in the meantime, the radiation concerns are spreading, as well. crews are now desperately trying to cool down fuel at one nuclear reactor. the number of dead has climbed to 6,500 people. and the search grows more frantic with 10,000 people still missing. >>> turning to fast-moving developments in libya, stopping gadhafi. britain, france, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be ta
>> jamie: at this hour we are getting word from japan there could be a third nuclear plant in trouble there. sources are saying that the american committee in japan is reporting update that the plan may have similar plants to explosion from yesterday, partial meltdown. keep it on fox. we'll send it to washington now have a good day. >> shannon: i'm shannon bream live in washington. we begin america's news headquarters with the fox news alert. japan is reeling from what he is calling the worst crisis since world war ii. the threat of nuclear disaster is growing as they try to avert multiple meltdown in nuclear reactors. thousands are dead from the earthquake and the tsunami it caused and more than a million people are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nucle
, stranding thousands of commuters. roz plater is live in the newsroom with more on this disaster in japan, roz? >> reporter: the pictures are surreal, hard for us to imagine. the area of devastation said to be nearly 200 miles long, 50 miles wide and the shaking may not be over yet. this is the scene inside the office building as the quake first struck before 3:00 p.m. along japan's northeastern coast. the massive quake, 8.9, set off a fury. fires. this one at a refinery outside of tokyo burned out of control, buildings collapsed trapping people beneath the rubble. chaos erupting in the streets as people ran for safety as dozens of after shocks, some greater than 6.0, followed the initial shake, one of the biggest quakes in modern history. >> it is gargantuan earthquake by modern standards. the rupture length was 180 miles. >> reporter: the powerful quake unleashed a powerful tsunami, a wall of water that swept up cars and homes as if they were toys. the floods pushed way over acres of land and authorities report they lost track of one train and a sh
>>> we've been showing you all kinds of destruction in japan. that's a little shaking, mud-spattered cocker span yell in the sendai area. he watched over his injured friend since the tsunami destroyed his home. rescue crews took both dogs to a vet for treatment. >>> candy crowley is anchors "the situation room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just brin
going without tonight here in japan. obviously the radiation concerns continue to mount. what exactly will happen with those nuclear reactors? and what does it mean for people living in japan and around the world? we'll certainly try to continue to investigate and bring you more answers as we get them. thanks for watching a very special edition of "sgmd" from japan. much more cnn right after the break. >>> well, we've got more cnn for you right now. and we have some fast-moving developments in libya this morning. the picture you're seeing is of a fighter jet being shot down. this comes as pro-government forces now are pounding the rebel stronghold of benghazi. this happens as a defiant moammar gadhafi warns the world that any interference comes with severe consequences. and from japan this morning, reports that a week's worth of radiation leaks from severely damaged reactors have now led to contaminated tap water, milk, and food. president obama monitoring both global hot spots from brazil this morning. we will have a live report. >>> from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, t
are watching "world one." >>> coming up, one week after japan was hit by an earthquake and then a tsunami, efforts to stop nuclear reactors from overheating are going ahead nonstop. >>> a moment of silence in the tsunami zone, over 6,000 people are now known to have died, and over 10,000 are still missing. >>> and for the people who have survived, life still tough. not only homeless, many of them are also short of basic necessities. >>> we begin in libya where rebels desperate for help have been given help after an historic vote at the u.n. the future of libya remains uncertain, but the international community has spoken and the message could be a game-changer for moammar gadhafi. richard roth has details on the diplomatic action from new york. >> reporter: it was a dramatic cliff hanger, susan rice had to work the phones to win enough support for passage of a resolution authorizing a no-fly zone over libya backed by military force. >> this resolution should send a strong message to colonel gadhafi and his regime that the violence must stop, the killing must stop, and the people of libya
>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
plant in japan. right now, emergency workers are risking their lives to prevent a complete nuclear meltdown. crews began the first of four helicopter water drops. at the same time, workers on the ground are using a water cannon meant for riots to shoot water directly into one of the reactors. it is a desperate last ditch effort to keep spent nuclear fuel rods from melting. in a potentially troubling sign white steam was again seen rising from three of the reactors. radiation levels at the plant dangerously high. japan's electric company is working desperately to reconnect power at the plant today. meantime, damning reports about the owner of the japanese power plant. accord to the australian, the owner falsified safety data and said in 1989 tokyo electric injected air into the containment vessel of a reactor number one to lower the leak rate and when caught apologized for "dishonest practices." now, abc's martha raddatz with the latest on the last ditch effort to saint planet. >>> 50 workers inside the plant working in the dark with nothing but flash lights wearing overalls and hea
>> chris: i'm chri chris walla. the latest on the battle in libya and the nuclear crisis in japan. right now on "fox news sunday." missile strikes. the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles as coalition forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update on talk with the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen live on "fox news sunday." then two leading senators weigh in on the mix, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works t work contain a nr disaster. we will get the latest from japan and talk with the secretary of energy steven chu. plus, we ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on these issues or following. all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington where we are tracking two major stories. we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and its allies are using military force to protect the antiqaddafi rebels. and in japan, where officials are making progress toward bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that later and talk with the secretary of en
away in tokyo a meeting of japan's prime minister at parliament turned to utter chaos. >> they're showing a city now on japanese television that looks like it's almost completely on fire. >> sparked fires in homes across the country and an oil refinery, a nuclear power plant shut down but no radiation escaped. closed airports. japan's famous bullet train shut down stranding hundreds of commuters. and then, a 23-foot wall of water crashed ashore. the tsunami sweeping away everything in its path. small boats smashed to bits. cars upturned and bobbing in the water. ships smashing against each other in part and a report of a ship with 100 people swept away. here's the latest on the devastation now. police in japan say 200 to 300 bodies have been found in sendai, the city closest to the epicenter. japanese tv reports as many as 4 million buildings in tokyo and their surrounding suburbs without power. scientists now say this quake is the fifth largest in the world since 1900. and it's the largest ever recorded in japan. a little more than an hour ago the first waves hit the u.s. main
radius to stay inside. we'll take a look at the difference between the u.s. recommendation and what japan is doing and saying. that's coming up later in the show. >> there is a big divide growing on that. many foreigners in japan trying to get out of the country. thousands of travelers packing tokyo's main airport. look at scene. many of them saying better safe than sorry. >> i'm worried with they are sharing about it and whether they are in control. not understanding japanese, it's a concern for me. >> i'm going home. the decision is not very clearly. so this decision is not difficult. but the situation is dangerous. so we have to leave. martha: the scramble is on to get out. several european airlines rerouted flights head for tokyo, now those travelers have to find their way to the southern part of the country. the faa say they are monitoring the situation. rick: the concern about radiation reaching the u.s. west coast. the feds are deploying radiation monitors in the area. it does not expect harmful radiation levels to reach the u.s. it posts that data on the web site. in japan the dis
>>> choppers in the air, water cannons on the ground, japan launches an attack on a crippled nuclear reactor hoping sea water can stop an unfolding nuclear catastrophe on this "american morning." i'm christine romans. welcome to "american morning." it's march 17th, st. patrick's day. >> st. paddy's day. you are irish? >> somewhere am i irish. >> have you have green eyes. >> i'm irish. >> i'm kiran chetry. we're following the latest on japan's crisis. the focus is how to get the reactors cooled down, specifically reactor number three at fukushima's daiichi power station. military helicopters are dropping 30 tons of sea waters on the crippled reactor's pool. >> they're also spraying on the ground, up to a dozen water truxz a trucks are in place. the united states is telling americans to get at least 50 miles away from the reactor. >> there is one more critical development to watch for, engineers are planning to begin the process, which is key in this whole thing, of restoring power to the daiichi complex. they want to bring in external power lines to try to get the plant's cool
>> corn over a nuclear power plant in japan . an explosion earlier and another emergency at the same facility and just a short time on ago, a report of a big after shock. the epi center just 80 mile nuclear reactor in. i am harris fallkener. we are live tonight. losing ground in libya. rebel forces driven back. punishing attacks from the sky on our journal on the ground in the middle. >> earlier al-gaddafi attacked the town. the bomb was dropped and antiaircraft fire going up. >> fox reports from inside of libya as calls for a no fly zone. >> 14 people on board of a casino bus killed after the driver loses control. >> he struck it and the bus is tipped over at that time and cuts down the middle of the bus. >> but did another vehicle play a role. >> union protestors refusing to quit. thousands returning to the wisconsin state capitol after a crippling defeat over the collective bargaining rights. they are promising someone will pay for their loss . >> it is sunday in japan. a new danger following the tsunami and earthquake. the building at the power plant is destroyed and
that before heading out for a tour of brazil. the president has been tracking the nuclear crisis in japan. we are tracking it as well. crews are drilling holes in several reactors to release pressure. now, abnormal radiation is detected in food near the plant. hello to you. this is "cnn saturday morning." good to be back with you. united nations call for a cease-fire not close to being observed now. massive explosions. moammar gadhafi forces are firing on that city. benghazi, you have been hearing that name for several weeks. it's the heart of the ob ration. we are in benghazi with government forces. >> caller: it seems as if gadhafi's forces began air assault over benghazi in the early morning hours here. they say it was fierce. at 8:45, we saw a plane overhead appearing to be heading south. around 9:10, one of our team witnessed a jet, a fighter jet, fall out of the sky in flames. we have since then spoken to an opposition fighter who told us that was one of their own aircraft they were sending out to try to stop, bring a stop to gadhafi's military assault on this very, very critical city.
to start leaving japan, they can. >> wolf blitzer traveling with the secretary of state, thank you so much. we know that american companies have already started doing this, getting their employees out, moving their employees and their families in some cases and people who have been working in tokyo, now working in other cities further south, getting their families out of the country. we know companies have started doing this. >> many in the airport trying to get out. that does it for us. >> "cnn newsroom" with carol costello starts right now. >> happy st. patrick's day day to you guys, too. 9:00 a.m. on the east coast and 6:00 a.m. on the west. helicopters and fire trucks move in and pour water on an overheating reactor site. the latest desperate attempt to reduce radiation levels at the damaged nuclear plant and, so far, it appears to be failing. >>> the u.s. begins vaticevacua families of diplomatic staff and help other americans get out of the area as well. >>> in the meantime, the death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is rising yet again. the latest numbers, more than 5,400 people
the devastation in japan but the nuclear crisis which gets more and more dire by the hour. toyota losing $73 million a day as a result of their plant closings and they're not the only ones sufficie s suffering . no market hit harder than japan's itself. the nikkei plummeting 16% over the past two days and as barry will point out, more than 20% from its levels prior to this crisis. all of those numbers, the worst they've seen in that country, since 1987 wall street had all sorts of common tear today including those who believe there is further room for weak innocence our markets that have run up over the past couple of years driven by frederal reserv money printing. what happen do investors are the rest of us ultimately anticipate will be effect of all of this? that is the question. joining us, ceo and exquity director. barry it looked like any asset that existed became worse less. oil, gold, everybody become worth less, why? >> the fear trade, the risk-on trade, people have a tendency to panic when they don't know what's going on. you don't know how to discount the impact of a possible nucle
of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertaint
are hammering financial markets, with stocks plunging worldwide, japan with its worst two-day slump in two decades, down 11%. death toll has officially reached 3,300. while thousands more remain missing. but today, a small sign of hope. a man found alive, pulled from the rubble, four days after the earthquake struck. a small miracle, but a miracle, nonetheless. nbc's kristin dahlgren is closely following developments in the area and joins us live from tokyo. good evening, kristin. >> reporter: good evening, martin. the latest we're hearing from this washington, d.c.-based nuclear research group is that they expect this disasterer to reach a seven on their scale of nuclear radioactive disasters, the only other accident to reach that level is chernobyl. so that gives you some idea of what some experts think we could possibly be looking at here. of course, nobody at this point knows. we're told even here in tokyo there's some elevated levels of radioactivity, about ten times what is normal and officials don't believe that poses any health risk, but others say they're not sure of what the long
that people are picking up now who have been traveling around in japan, at least they were working at the nuclear facility, are minuscule. there is a lot of radiation at the site, but there's not a lot of radiation in the environment. there's very sensitive instruments to measure it, but it does not mean that the level is a health threat. now, the big concern right now is that here in tokyo, because this is now downwind, the winds have shifted. usually, they have been pushing the radiation out to sea. now the winds are aiming at tokyo. and 30 million people live in the greater tokyo area. and so if there were to be a massive release now, it's a big deal. so there's a lot of fear about that issue around here. >> and so, bob, given what the japanese government has said so far, i mean, they're telling people within a 19-mile radius to stay inside. our government is telling americans 50 miles away, no, get out. do the japanese people trust their government is going to protect them? >> reporter: well, some do and some don't, of course. and there's a lot of people who have already left t
good thing; he just made it. of japan. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." as worries grow over unrest in the middle east, crude oil futures have hit again $100 a barrel in new york. buy orders increased on tuesday as market players became more concerned about future oil supplies on news that iran security forces clamped down on anti-government protesters. iran is the second largest oil producer among opec oil member countries. this e benchmark wti crude futures topped $100 a barrel in after-hours trading for the first time since last wednesday. the index is now at that price. on the new york stock exchange, share prices plunged on tuesday amid growing worries that higher oil prices may slow down the world economic recovery. the dow jones industrial average closed at 12058, down 168 points from the previous day. u.s. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has indicated america's economy is growing at a faster pace than last year but he cautions over soaring oil prices over continuing soaring prices in the arab world. >> sustained rises in the price 0 of oil and other commodities
, candy. good evening, everyone. tonight major breaking news in two important global dramas. japan uses helicopters and water cannons in a desperate effort to cool fuel. and tonight there's word a new power line has been brought to the fukushima daiichi complex, but as friday dawns in asia, no sign of a major breakthrough and growing worries of two of the six reactors still in distress. >>> and first a major but belated commitment to stop the brutal march of gadhafi in libya. they voted to authorize not only a no-fly zone over libya, but also all necessary measures including military force to stop the government and mercenaries from slaughtering civilians. i'm told the pentagon and nato partners have contingencies that include air strikes to punish military units, leaving gadhafi's push on his strongholds in the east. now that the u.n. authorized sfors, the strikes could be carried out within hours if the president and his partners around the world issue the orders. cnn's richard roth track ad dramatic vote at the the united nations tonight. richards? >> john, u.s. ambassador to the u.n
, what happened in japan, like everybody else. it's just so devastating. i can't imagine that there's going to be one agency in massachusetts who just says, you go here, you here -- i'm concerned not only in massachusetts but throughout the country if something like this happens, i'm not confident yet and i'm hopeful someone can give me the information that make sure that we all know what to do. you know? is it evacuation? is it command and control? is it military? i think it's a combination of everything. can you shed any light on my thoughts? >> in timely, i can start and then like to have an opportunity, senator brown -- >> just do that. i don't want to take the senator's time. >> i want to make one point. >> i think you're asking an important question. >> okay. >> i'd urge -- >> many of our disasters -- we always start with who's going to be the closest responders, no matter how big the disaster. it's always the local responders. we saw this, they can be destroyed, in the disaster itself. we saw this in katrina and in the tsunami. the next is the governor and their team includin
their estimate of the cost to japan, to claim that the wealth loss was almost $1 trillion. that is clearly not realistic at all. the drop has been too much. one reason is that the market has been then. there is not that much confidence in it. in europe, there has also been a drop in the stock market, but the same story. the u.s. stock market has been pretty resilient. nothing -- nothing much has really happened. maybe it is unfortunate, but japan is simply not a big market for the united states. we do not export much to anybody anymore. in particular we do not export a lot to japan. we worry about japan, it is too soon about a big interruption to our electronic and automobiles supplies. i do not expect that to happen. i do not think that what goes on in japan will have a big effect on the u.s. economy. >> yes, sir. >> there's not much talk about the radioactive effect on human beings. the radio act cavity in the air and in the mark -- and in the ocean, should we monitor it -- the radioactivity in the air and in the ocean, should we monitor it? and also, over the years, there is a province
in the area around japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant today, forcing emergency workers to temporarily abandon the facility, as tens of thousands of homeless struggled with snows and bitter cold. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on efforts to control the growing crisis in japan, including the stories of survivors and rescue crews in towns virtually wiped out by the tsunami. >> woodruff: we examine the health risks from the radiation spewing from the reactors and being carried by the wind far from japan's shores. >> ifill: plus, kwame holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grad
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